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What Do You Use a Volume Pill For?

What do you use a volume pills for? If you do not know what that is, then you may not believe that it is a real thing after you do a Google search. I am really wondering who has this problem. I just happened to find out what this particular pill is in my wanderings […]

Soy Supplements Won’t Ease Asthma, Study Finds...

Despite hints from prior research that soy supplements might help asthma patients breathe easier, a major new study finds the nutrient has no beneficial effect on lung function. “This study highlights why it is so important to perform well-designed, placebo-controlled studies when associations are reported between specific nutrients and disease outcomes,” study lead author Dr. Lewis Smith, professor of medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, said in a university news release. The study, published in the May 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, also highlights the need to focus on overall health — including diet and lifestyle — to manage asthma, rather than on specific approaches such as consuming more soy, he said. “You are what you eat, but that’s a whole constellation of foods, not just a single food or a single component of a food,” Smith said. “Instead of focusing on supplements, we should be taking a more holistic approach.” His team note that prior research had suggested that soy might shield against asthma, including a study that found low rates of asthma in countries with high rates of dietary soy intake, such as China and Japan. To test the theory, Smith’s team studied the effects of soy in 386 people age 12 and older with poorly controlled asthma. All of them were taking medications to treat their asthma, but none were consuming soy regularly before enrolling in the study. Half...

Many Kids With Asthma Also Sensitive to Peanuts: Study...

Sensitivity to peanuts is common among children with asthma, yet many children and their parents are unaware of the problem, a new study finds. There’s been little research into the link between childhood asthma and peanut allergy, according to the study authors. “Many of the respiratory symptoms of peanut allergy can mirror those of an asthma attack, and vice versa. Examples of those symptoms include shortness of breath, wheezing and coughing,” said the study lead author, Dr. Robert Cohn from Mercy Children’s Hospital in Toledo, Ohio, in a news release from the American Thoracic Society. The study findings were scheduled to be presented Sunday at the American Thoracic Society meeting in Denver. Findings presented at meetings are generally viewed as preliminary until they’ve been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Cohn and his colleagues analyzed the medical records of more than 1,500 children with asthma in Toledo, Ohio. The results showed that about 11 percent of the children had a documented history of peanut allergy. The researchers found that nearly 44 percent had undergone a blood test to check for peanut allergy. Just over 20 percent of those children tested positive for peanut sensitivity. However, more than half of these children and their families didn’t know the child had any sensitivity to peanuts. “This study demonstrates children with asthma might benefit from a test for peanut sensitivity, especially when control of wheezing and coughing is difficult to achieve. If a...

Losing Weight May Ease Asthma in Obese People...

Losing weight may help reduce asthma severity in obese adults, a new Canadian study finds. “We were pleased to see significant improvement in asthma symptoms, as well as quality of life for these individuals. This study further supports the need to manage [chronic disorders] to improve patient lives,” said study author Dr. Smita Pakhale, from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa. People who are obese are about 1.5 times more likely to have asthma than those who aren’t obese. A 3-unit increase in body mass index — BMI, an estimate of body fat based on weight and height — is associated with a 35 percent increase in the risk of asthma, the researchers said in a news release from the American College of Chest Physicians. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal weight. A BMI of 25 to 29.9 is overweight, while 30 and over is considered obese. The study found that when obese people with asthma lost weight, they showed improvement in asthma severity, asthma control and quality of life. The study appears in the June issue of the journal...

How to Avoid July Fourth Allergy Flare-Ups...

Fireworks, picnics and parades are favorite Fourth of July traditions for many people, but for those with allergies or asthma these activities could be uncomfortable or even dangerous. “Summer is the time of year when everyone wants to enjoy being outside,” said allergist Dr. James Sublett, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. “That’s why it’s so important to be prepared, so allergies and asthma don’t overshadow the festivities.” Asthma and allergy experts offer these tips for avoiding or coping with common summer triggers, particularly on the holiday weekend: Smoke: Fireworks and campfires are fun holiday traditions but smoke can trigger an asthma flare-up. Try to maintain a safe distance from fireworks and campfires or stand upwind. It’s also important to carry a reliever inhaler at all times. Chlorine: Chlorine isn’t an allergen, but it can cause allergy-like symptoms, such as itchy eyes. For people with asthma, chlorine could also cause breathing problems. If irritation develops, wash the affected area with clean water. People with a more serious reaction may need a prescription corticosteroid cream. Stings: Insect venom can cause serious or life-threatening reactions that require immediate medical attention. Facial swelling and trouble breathing are signs of a severe allergy that may require epinephrine (adrenaline) and evaluation by an allergist. In some cases, those with an insect allergy are treated with allergy shots. Temperature swings: A rise in temperature can cause an asthma attack. So can...