Recent Articles

Many Kids With Asthma Also Sensitive to Peanuts: Study...

Sensitivity to peanuts is common among children with asthma, yet many children and their parents are unaware of the problem, a new study finds. There’s been little research into the link between childhood asthma and peanut allergy, according to the study authors. “Many of the respiratory symptoms of peanut allergy can mirror those of an asthma attack, and vice versa. Examples of those symptoms include shortness of breath, wheezing and coughing,” said the study lead author, Dr. Robert Cohn from Mercy Children’s Hospital in Toledo, Ohio, in a news release from the American Thoracic Society. The study findings were scheduled to be presented Sunday at the American Thoracic Society meeting in Denver. Findings presented at meetings are generally viewed as preliminary until they’ve been published in a peer-reviewed journal. Cohn and his colleagues analyzed the medical records of more than 1,500 children with asthma in Toledo, Ohio. The results showed that about 11 percent of the children had a documented history of peanut allergy. The researchers found that nearly 44 percent had undergone a blood test to check for peanut allergy. Just over 20 percent of those children tested positive for peanut sensitivity. However, more than half of these children and their families didn’t know the child had any sensitivity to peanuts. “This study demonstrates children with asthma might benefit from a test for peanut sensitivity, especially when control of wheezing and coughing is difficult to achieve. If a...

Losing Weight May Ease Asthma in Obese People...

Losing weight may help reduce asthma severity in obese adults, a new Canadian study finds. “We were pleased to see significant improvement in asthma symptoms, as well as quality of life for these individuals. This study further supports the need to manage [chronic disorders] to improve patient lives,” said study author Dr. Smita Pakhale, from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa. People who are obese are about 1.5 times more likely to have asthma than those who aren’t obese. A 3-unit increase in body mass index — BMI, an estimate of body fat based on weight and height — is associated with a 35 percent increase in the risk of asthma, the researchers said in a news release from the American College of Chest Physicians. A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is considered normal weight. A BMI of 25 to 29.9 is overweight, while 30 and over is considered obese. The study found that when obese people with asthma lost weight, they showed improvement in asthma severity, asthma control and quality of life. The study appears in the June issue of the journal...